QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN COLONOSCOPY AND LOW VOLUME ENDOSCOPISTS:

  • William Simpson Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine (OSU-COM)
Keywords: colonoscopy, quality improvement, adenoma detection rate, colon cancer screeing

Abstract

Colonoscopy is accepted as a means to screen patients for colon cancer and adenomatous colon polyps, but must be performed at a quality level high enough to make recommendations to patients and primary care providers with clinical confidence. We report the impact of implementation of an ongoing colonoscopy quality improvement initiative at a single institution on the performance of low volume endoscopists. The program, based on recognized national standards, yielded marked improvement in the performance of these providers. Adenoma detection rate actually improved in both the high volume and low volume endoscopists. Procedure volume is a poor predictor of competence in endoscopy, but education and monitoring of quality metrics helped low volume endoscopists meet performance standards

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Published
2019-11-08
Section
Medical